The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction

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Title
The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction
Authors and Corporations
Kimberly Hirsh
Year of Publication
2020
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rft.atitle The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction
rft.genre article
rft.date 2020-09-16
x.date 2020-09-16T20:42:10Z
abstract With the publication of Studies in Historical Method in 1896, Mary Sheldon Barnes introduced the “Source Method” of teaching history to secondary educators (Cherry, 2010). In this method, students investigate and develop an understanding of history by interacting with primary sources, documents generated in the period of history students are studying. It was not until 1986, however, that a work in the literature of archives articulated the potential for collaboration between archivists and K-12 educators, when Ken Osborne asserted, “if archives are to realize anything like their educational potential, there will have to be a good deal of joint planning and consultation between archivists and educators” (1986, p. 28). Over the past thirty years, many cultural heritage organizations, including state archives, the Library of Congress, and special collections library members of American Research Libraries have undertaken K-12 outreach activities (Cherry, 2010; Visser, 2006). Such activities can serve not only as educational outreach but also advocacy opportunities for archives as institutions and archivists as a profession (Dickson & Gorzalski, 2013). This literature review examines archival and special collections outreach for the K-12 audience, providing a rationale and identifying opportunities for such outreach, describing the current landscape of digital K-12 archival outreach projects, offering examples of non-digital K-12 outreach projects, highlighting projects that exemplify integrated and collaborative approaches, and comparing proposed models for future outreach projects
authors Array ( [rft.au] => Kimberly Hirsh )
doi 10.31229/OSF.IO/DFYME
languages eng
url http://dx.doi.org/10.31229/OSF.IO/DFYME
http://osf.io/dfyme/
x.subjects Archival Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
archives
Library and Information Science
k-12 education
LIS Scholarship Archive
instruction
bepress
special collections
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description With the publication of Studies in Historical Method in 1896, Mary Sheldon Barnes introduced the “Source Method” of teaching history to secondary educators (Cherry, 2010). In this method, students investigate and develop an understanding of history by interacting with primary sources, documents generated in the period of history students are studying. It was not until 1986, however, that a work in the literature of archives articulated the potential for collaboration between archivists and K-12 educators, when Ken Osborne asserted, “if archives are to realize anything like their educational potential, there will have to be a good deal of joint planning and consultation between archivists and educators” (1986, p. 28). Over the past thirty years, many cultural heritage organizations, including state archives, the Library of Congress, and special collections library members of American Research Libraries have undertaken K-12 outreach activities (Cherry, 2010; Visser, 2006). Such activities can serve not only as educational outreach but also advocacy opportunities for archives as institutions and archivists as a profession (Dickson & Gorzalski, 2013). This literature review examines archival and special collections outreach for the K-12 audience, providing a rationale and identifying opportunities for such outreach, describing the current landscape of digital K-12 archival outreach projects, offering examples of non-digital K-12 outreach projects, highlighting projects that exemplify integrated and collaborative approaches, and comparing proposed models for future outreach projects
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spelling Kimberly Hirsh Archival Science Social and Behavioral Sciences archives Library and Information Science k-12 education LIS Scholarship Archive instruction bepress special collections http://dx.doi.org/10.31229/OSF.IO/DFYME http://osf.io/dfyme/ With the publication of Studies in Historical Method in 1896, Mary Sheldon Barnes introduced the “Source Method” of teaching history to secondary educators (Cherry, 2010). In this method, students investigate and develop an understanding of history by interacting with primary sources, documents generated in the period of history students are studying. It was not until 1986, however, that a work in the literature of archives articulated the potential for collaboration between archivists and K-12 educators, when Ken Osborne asserted, “if archives are to realize anything like their educational potential, there will have to be a good deal of joint planning and consultation between archivists and educators” (1986, p. 28). Over the past thirty years, many cultural heritage organizations, including state archives, the Library of Congress, and special collections library members of American Research Libraries have undertaken K-12 outreach activities (Cherry, 2010; Visser, 2006). Such activities can serve not only as educational outreach but also advocacy opportunities for archives as institutions and archivists as a profession (Dickson & Gorzalski, 2013). This literature review examines archival and special collections outreach for the K-12 audience, providing a rationale and identifying opportunities for such outreach, describing the current landscape of digital K-12 archival outreach projects, offering examples of non-digital K-12 outreach projects, highlighting projects that exemplify integrated and collaborative approaches, and comparing proposed models for future outreach projects The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction
spellingShingle Kimberly Hirsh, The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction, Archival Science, Social and Behavioral Sciences, archives, Library and Information Science, k-12 education, LIS Scholarship Archive, instruction, bepress, special collections
title The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction
title_full The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction
title_fullStr The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction
title_full_unstemmed The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction
title_short The Role of Archives and Special Collections in K-12 Instruction
title_sort the role of archives and special collections in k-12 instruction
topic Archival Science, Social and Behavioral Sciences, archives, Library and Information Science, k-12 education, LIS Scholarship Archive, instruction, bepress, special collections
url http://dx.doi.org/10.31229/OSF.IO/DFYME, http://osf.io/dfyme/