School Librarians as Leaders

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Title
School Librarians as Leaders
Authors and Corporations
Kimberly Hirsh
Year of Publication
2020
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rft.atitle School Librarians as Leaders
rft.genre article
rft.date 2020-09-18
x.date 2020-09-18T17:47:45Z
abstract With the publication of Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs in 2009, the American Association of School Librarians articulated a role that school librarians had not been expected to take on before: that of leader. Earlier guidelines documents had embedded a variety of leadership activities within the roles of information specialist, instructional consultant or partner, teacher, and program administrator (American Association of School Librarians, 1988, 1998). Without the expectation of leadership clearly articulated in their guidelines, however, school librarians did not perceive themselves as leaders (Ishizuka, Minkel, & Lifer, 2002; McCracken, 2001; Shannon, 2004, 2008; Vansickle, 2000) and neither did the principals who supervised them (Hartzell, 2002). Since the release of Empowering Learners, some states have begun to require school librarians to demonstrate leadership to obtain or maintain their teacher certification and to retain their positions (Public Schools of North Carolina, 2013). The empirical literature surrounding school library leadership reflects this shift; in the era before the publication of Empowering Learners, few studies were published focusing on leadership in the school library, but since its release, several studies have been published. The literature surrounding school library leadership relies on leadership theories grounded in the concept of shared leadership. It addresses preservice leadership education for school librarians, their ability to implement professional guidelines and standards related to leadership, and their leadership capacity in specific facets of leadership such as collaboration, evidence-based practice, and technology integration.
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doi 10.31229/OSF.IO/UH9S2
languages eng
url http://osf.io/uh9s2/
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x.subjects LIS Scholarship Archive
leadership
school librarians
Library and Information Science
bepress
Social and Behavioral Sciences
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description With the publication of Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs in 2009, the American Association of School Librarians articulated a role that school librarians had not been expected to take on before: that of leader. Earlier guidelines documents had embedded a variety of leadership activities within the roles of information specialist, instructional consultant or partner, teacher, and program administrator (American Association of School Librarians, 1988, 1998). Without the expectation of leadership clearly articulated in their guidelines, however, school librarians did not perceive themselves as leaders (Ishizuka, Minkel, & Lifer, 2002; McCracken, 2001; Shannon, 2004, 2008; Vansickle, 2000) and neither did the principals who supervised them (Hartzell, 2002). Since the release of Empowering Learners, some states have begun to require school librarians to demonstrate leadership to obtain or maintain their teacher certification and to retain their positions (Public Schools of North Carolina, 2013). The empirical literature surrounding school library leadership reflects this shift; in the era before the publication of Empowering Learners, few studies were published focusing on leadership in the school library, but since its release, several studies have been published. The literature surrounding school library leadership relies on leadership theories grounded in the concept of shared leadership. It addresses preservice leadership education for school librarians, their ability to implement professional guidelines and standards related to leadership, and their leadership capacity in specific facets of leadership such as collaboration, evidence-based practice, and technology integration.
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spelling Kimberly Hirsh LIS Scholarship Archive leadership school librarians Library and Information Science bepress Social and Behavioral Sciences http://osf.io/uh9s2/ http://dx.doi.org/10.31229/OSF.IO/UH9S2 With the publication of Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs in 2009, the American Association of School Librarians articulated a role that school librarians had not been expected to take on before: that of leader. Earlier guidelines documents had embedded a variety of leadership activities within the roles of information specialist, instructional consultant or partner, teacher, and program administrator (American Association of School Librarians, 1988, 1998). Without the expectation of leadership clearly articulated in their guidelines, however, school librarians did not perceive themselves as leaders (Ishizuka, Minkel, & Lifer, 2002; McCracken, 2001; Shannon, 2004, 2008; Vansickle, 2000) and neither did the principals who supervised them (Hartzell, 2002). Since the release of Empowering Learners, some states have begun to require school librarians to demonstrate leadership to obtain or maintain their teacher certification and to retain their positions (Public Schools of North Carolina, 2013). The empirical literature surrounding school library leadership reflects this shift; in the era before the publication of Empowering Learners, few studies were published focusing on leadership in the school library, but since its release, several studies have been published. The literature surrounding school library leadership relies on leadership theories grounded in the concept of shared leadership. It addresses preservice leadership education for school librarians, their ability to implement professional guidelines and standards related to leadership, and their leadership capacity in specific facets of leadership such as collaboration, evidence-based practice, and technology integration. School Librarians as Leaders
spellingShingle Kimberly Hirsh, School Librarians as Leaders, LIS Scholarship Archive, leadership, school librarians, Library and Information Science, bepress, Social and Behavioral Sciences
title School Librarians as Leaders
title_full School Librarians as Leaders
title_fullStr School Librarians as Leaders
title_full_unstemmed School Librarians as Leaders
title_short School Librarians as Leaders
title_sort school librarians as leaders
topic LIS Scholarship Archive, leadership, school librarians, Library and Information Science, bepress, Social and Behavioral Sciences
url http://osf.io/uh9s2/, http://dx.doi.org/10.31229/OSF.IO/UH9S2